Global Crop Protection 2017

13th – 14th March, 2017
Brussels, Belgium

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“Ensuring Food Security with Effective Crop Protection Solutions”

“Pest species are creating new obstacles, resulting in decreased production of crops worldwide with the losses adding up to almost $US120 billion per year, weed invasion alone costs domestic agriculture $3.9 billion per year.”

“Invasive pest causing rice loss up to 35%, equivalent to US$55m in Asia.

“Almost 20 per cent of Australian wheat is lost to pathogens
pre-harvest and Africa is discarding $4 billion worth of grain annually due to pre and post-harvest losses.”

“The Global Biological Crop Protection Market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 11.33% during
2016–2021.

About the Event

Demand for grain has increased almost 90% since 1980 and will continue to increase at an average rate of around 1.4% per year. However, crop pests, diseases and weeds result in loss of up to 40% of global crop yield every year. Crop protection products are vital to the production of a safe, affordable and abundant supply of crops. Without effective pesticides, the loss would have been double. According to a recently published report, the Global Crop Protection Market is expected to grow at the CAGR of 5.23% during 2015-2022 and it is estimated to be $70.12 billion by 2022.

Growing demand of naturally occurring substance for pest management and over population has fueled the biopesticides market in many regions; estimated to be valued at USD 3.36 Billion in 2016 and projected to reach USD 8.82 Billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 17.4% from 2016. Significant growth is expected in the bioinsecticides segment.

The crop protection industry is one of the most highly regulated industries in the world. Industrial alliances amongst MNCs promotes innovation and creates new opportunities to many, contributing in tackling exposure of field crops to factors, such as over-exploitation of resources, increasing pollution, and climate change.

In this regard, having a comprehensive review on the major market drivers, opportunities, restraints, challenges, winning imperatives, and key issues of the market is a must for the industry.

Global Crop Protection  Conference 2017 will highlight the newly developed alternatives to chemical pesticides, new innovations like eco-friendly Pesticides, Fertilizers and Herbicide, effect of climate change on crop production, benefits of integrated pest management, use of innovative technologies for favourable crop production, and also discuss the impact of advancements of current or newly developed governmental policies on the crop protection industry.

Global Crop Protection Conference also aims to assist the industry experts to understand the new tools for agroecosystem management, projections for seed coating materials market, bio-control market, seed treatments and seed enhancements to extend the crop protection window, and phytobiomes enabling sustainable and profitable production of crops to meet global demands while minimizing negative impacts on the environment.

This conference will provide a global platform to the Agriculture and Food industry, Crop Protection Manufacturers, Fertilizer Manufacturers, Chemical Specialist, Extension and Crop Specialists, Policy Makers, Agricultural Crime Units, Agribusiness Dealers, Environmental and Natural Distributors and others involved in Food and Agriculture Security Planning for enhancing their knowledge with a global overview of the sector, exploring the latest innovations, and managing the key changes taking place in the industry.

Global Challenges and Scenario
Europe
    • Parliament Rejects National Bans on GM Feed

    • Realistic sustainability criteria and strict food fraud checks to study the contamination of organic food

    • Income Per EU Agricultural worker down by 4.3 per cent

    • European Union Authorizes 10 New GM Food Crops
Asia
    • Invasive pest causing rice loss up to 35%, equivalent to US$55m in Asia

    • More than 2.2 billion people in the region rely on agriculture for their livelihoods. Food and feed crop demand will nearly double in the coming 50 years, due to the constant rise in population

    • Less investment in agriculture creating stagnant and declining yields of major crops
Africa
    • Africa discarding $4 billion worth of grain annually due to pre and post-harvest losses

    • Zambia: Government using Air Force to contain spread of pests

    • Sub-Saharan Africa: Two-third of the working population still making their living from agriculture

    • Depleted soils cost African farmers US$4 billion each year in lost productivity
Australia
    • Banning of Omethoate: Australia exploring for a better alternative

    • The estimated present annual crop loss due to invertebrate pests totaled $359.8 million

    • Present cultural and pesticide controls of invertebrate pests effectively reduced losses by $1,366.1 million

    • Western Australia repeals partial ban on GMO crops
KEY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Addressing the Need for More Sustainable Use of Pesticides
  • Crop Protection: Key to Food Security for the Ever-Growing Population
  • In-depth Analysis of the Crop Protection Industry in Africa
  • Climate Change Effects on Expression of Resistance to Insect Pests
  • Acute Importance of Intellectual Property for Favorable Agricultural Innovations
  • Soil Compaction: Restore and Enhancing Unproductive Land for Cultivation
  • Cloud-based Applications to Increase Crop Yields and Farmers’ Profitability
  • Comprehending the Reason Behind Patent War Looming Over Europe’s Crop Diversity
  • Drone Technology- Identifying the Potential Tool for Better Control of Agriculture
  • Challenges facing global agriculture sector: Market Instability, climate change
  • Use of Integrated Crop Management (ICM), to encourage preventative and environmentally sustainable approaches to crop protection to help reduce pesticide use
  • Developments and implementation of methods for the detection and monitoring of seed- borne plant pathogens
Be Our Partner

 

Global Crop Protection Conference is an excellent opportunity to enhance business  relations in a positive learning environment. Through this event, you will be in a position to raise your corporate profile and showcase your products and services to the people associated with the Agriculture and chemical industry.

 

KEEPING UP WITH THE INDUSTRY’S VIEWS

TTTTF, Cocoa Pod Borer, Potato Blight, Banana Fungus, Coffee Leaf Rust

Posted on: 22 February 2017

Existence of TTTTF, a kind of stem rust—named for the characteristic brownish stain it lays down as it destroys wheat leaves and stems—damaged tens of thousands hectares of crops in Sicily. Tests suggests that the pathogen can infect dozens of laboratory-grown strains of wheat, including hardy varieties that are usually highly resistant to crop disease. Wheat rust, a devastating disease known as the “polio of agriculture”, has spread from Africa to South and Central Asia, the Middle East and Europe, with calamitous losses for the world’s second most important grain crop, after rice.

Adding further concern, two new strains of another wheat disease, yellow rust, have been spotted over large areas of Europe for the first time, causing severe wheat damage. Source Greater influx of crop pathogens has influenced breeders, scientists and agrochemical companies in Europe and all across the world to share diagnostic facilities and crucial information about potential outbreaks. Producing resistant varieties, along with study of invasive crop species and early-warning system will provide farmers enough warning to monitor fields and apply fungicides. Timely action is Crucial!

What are the other deadly crop diseases and what are the potential effects? Developing resistant crops is the answer? Halting the crop disease’s spread, CABI’s, Strategic Partnerships Director, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, at Hotel Novotel Brussels Centre Tour Noire, Belgium, will shed light upon the benefits of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Classical Biological Control (CBC), to be put in place to overcome some of the major crop issues facing the world.

To find out more about Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

To reserve your spot  Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Wolbachia: New Means of Controlling Crop-Damaging Pest

Posted on: 16 February 2017

A bacterium common in insects has been discovered in a plant-parasitic roundworm, opening up the possibility of a new, environmentally friendly way of controlling the crop-damaging pest. The worm, Pratylenchus penetrans, is one of the "lesion nematodes" — microscopic animals that deploy their mouths like syringes to extract nutrients from the roots of plants, damaging them in the process. This particular nematode uses more than 150 species as hosts, including mint, raspberry, lily and potato.

The newly discovered bacterium is a strain in the genus Wolbachia, one of the world's most widespread endosymbionts (organisms that live within other organisms), contributing majorly in Nematode biocontrol. Wolbachia is present in roughly 60% of the globe's arthropods, among them insects, spiders and crustaceans, and also lives in nematodes that cause illness in humans.

Adoption of Biocontrol strategy for the effective management of crop pests and diseases has been addressed by many regions. The potential for managing the pest population via biocontrol rather than environment-damaging fumigants, is the need for the hour. In regard to this , the New Unit of BiPA, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will shed light upon the application of biocontrol techniques for crop protection, along with techniques to reduce the effect of crop pests, diseases and reliance on harmful synthetic pesticides; minimizing negative impact on the environment.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

A New Technique is a Whole New Way of Looking at Crop Protection

Posted on: 6 February 2017

Gene-silencing—is a new crop protection technique that acts as a better alternative to chemical products. This technique targets the crops themselves, giving them an added ability to ward off pests and diseases by targeting crop genes, without altering their DNA.

By using a non-toxic, degradable spray based on nanotechnology, gene silencing contributes in tackling the two greatest threats to global food crops—pests and diseases. By combining clay nanoparticles with designer ‘RNAs’ (molecules with essential roles in gene biology), it is possible to silence certain genes within plants. The spray has been shown to give plants virus protection for at least 20 days following a single application. When sprayed, the plant ‘thinks’ it is being attacked by a disease or pest insect and responds by protecting itself.Source 

With the crop industry striving towards achieving global food security, the need for new technologies such as ‘gene silencing’ is a way forward to solve global challenges affecting crop protection. Global Crop Protection 2017, conference scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, aims to disseminate knowledge on numerous approaches that integrates practices for economic control of pests. Addressing the need of integrated pest management for sustainable agriculture, Researcher from Julius Kuehn-Institut will highlight the leading complement and alternatives to synthetic pesticides, along with the best combination of cultural, biological and chemical measures to manage diseases, insects, weeds and other pests; taking into account all relevant control tactics and methods that are locally available, evaluating their potential cost-effectiveness.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Understanding the Phytobiomes for Improved Crop Productivity

Posted on: 30 January 2017

It is a critical time in which new innovative approaches are needed to sustainably increase global crop productivity to meet the demand of an additional 2.4 billion people by 2050. To tackle agricultural complex challenges, a complete analysis of phytobiomes along with complete investigation on endophytic communities could provide critical information to drive agriculture innovations. Addressing the information gaps in bacterial gene expression in soil and possible future research to develop an understanding of core rhizosphere microbiome and how plant roots are influenced by it.

A shift in agricultural production from managing primarily individual components of cropping systems to managing whole systems using comprehensive systems-based knowledge of phytobiomes is the need of the hour. The current technological developments, such as advances in genomic technologies, computational sciences, system-level approaches and precision agriculture – are enabling unprecedented insights for probing the complex interactions within phytobiomes. It is envisioned that growers will have at their disposal crop varieties that better exploit phytobiome components in specific environments for stronger resilience to pests and limited water and nutrients. Translating knowledge of phytobiomes into next generation precision agriculture tools and techniques will empower farmers to produce sufficient crops to meet global demands.Source 

This conference will bring together all ongoing initiatives from diverse scientific disciplines and connecting the dots between fundamental science and application, with an aim to provide growers with practical tools to manage his/her own crop biomes for maximum efficiency, sustainability, and profitability President, Eversole Associates, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will focus on microbiome efforts to design a path forward for a phytobiomes systems approach, shed light upon the patterns for enabling paradigm shift in crop production, prescribe cropping systems, methods, and management practices best suited for a particular farm or field.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Biostimulants and Micronutrients: What the Future Holds ?

Posted on: 24 January 2017

The Biostimulants and Micronutrients market is projected to reach USD 2.91 Billion by 2021, at a CAGR of 10.4% and USD 8.05, at a CAGR of 8.2% Billion by 2021, respectively. The market continues to grow faster than many other areas of the crop protection sector.


The demand for biostimulants and micronutrients is driven by the emerging need for sustainable crop production practices, increasing demand of biofuels, high-quality yield and the growing requirement for food across the world, with China, India, and Japan predicted to be the fastest growing market from the Asia-Pacific region. Nutritive food, need for sustainable crop yields and management of crop production costs are the main factors fueling the market development in this region. Source 1

Row crops, microbials, zinc and cereals segments are the major contributors, assisting in the consistent development of the Biostimulants and Micronutrients sectors. Increasing investment in crop protection industry along with governmental subsidies and awareness programs, are meant to support and create a self-sustaining environment for these segments to flourish. In regard to this, the Commercial Director of PHC, at the conference Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13–14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will discuss upon the emerging worldwide demand for biostimulants and micronutrients and increasing their usage for enhancing crop yields, highlight growth opportunities for major market players, and shed light on the upcoming innovative solutions in this arena, and also give an overview of the current and future market scenario.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

With or Without pesticide? - Europe Crop Protection Chemicals Market – Growth, Trends and Forecasts

Is Europe ready to increase crop production without using pesticides? this can be never possible because overall crop production in Europe depends on pesticides and for decades it is being helping farmers to compete with increasing food demand.  Growth in the demand for the crop protection chemicals is expected to exceed in future as the Europe and other parts of the world continue to use it to safeguard their crop from various insects, diseases and pests.Growing demand for crop protection chemicals is compelling global players to widen their crop protection offerings.

Increasing European population has pushed farmers and crop experts to depend extensively on pesticides to meet ever-increased food demand, New legislation-‘pesticides package’ – recently adopted by the European Parliament creates new constraints on the use of plant protection products and calls for an in-depth reconsideration of crop protection solutions throughout Europe.

In Europe as well as in other parts of the world, pesticide market is driven by the need to increase crop yield and its efficiency. The Europe’s population is growing, but the land is decreasing pushing farmers to increase their yields. New farming practices are adopted by farmers to increase crop yields.

Meanwhile, Bio-pesticides adoption is also occurring all over the Europe, especially in developed and some developing countries. Pesticides help in optimal usage of resources for plant growth and protect the crop from various pathogens.

Pesticides can be broadly classified into four groups depending on their usage. Farmers use herbicides for killing unwanted plants called weeds, insecticides for killing insects, fungicides for treating diseases caused by fungus and other pesticides for treating diseases, which are not caused by fungi or insects. Fungicides accounted for more than 32% of total pesticides sales in 2015.

As per the recent studies,the direct economic impact due to the absence of viable plant protection solutions for crops has been estimated over a billion Euros per year, impacting million of hectares throughout Europe.

The global crop protection product demand is being driven by decreasing arable land, ever-increasing population and the need for higher crop yields. However, the Complicating matters are growing attention and regulation on chemical pesticides, which can be toxic to the environment at large. Crop protection product producers need to tackle this situation and look for more eco-friendly crop protection products. For companies like Eco-Pesticides that are focused on biologic-based pesticides.

Major legislative challenges for the crop protection industry

Before discussing various challenges that European crop protection industry confronts in order to  protect the environment from toxic pesticides and to achieve ever-growing food demand.First, we need to understand the overall dependence of European agriculture on chemicals. According to the reports, the European market for crop protection chemicals, in terms of active ingredient volume was estimated at 639.4 KT in 2011 and is expected to reach 741.9.5KT by 2018. Europe is the second largest market for herbicides.

A new report by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has found that more than 97% of foods contain pesticide residue levels that fall within legal limits.

About 55% of the samples evaluated by EFSA were free of detectable traces of these chemicals.This means nearly half of food products in Europe contain residues of pesticides. Europe’s food supply is among the safest in the world, however, some traces of pesticides exceeding the maximum residue levels (MRLs) were found more often in imported food (5.7%) than in samples originating from the EU and the European Economic Area (1.4%).

Feeding rapidly growing population while relying on ever-scarcer natural resources and protecting the environment. Europe has a responsibility to address that challenge by improving food security and ensuring the contribution of sustainable, productive agriculture to the environment and the economy

Pesticides play a pivotal role in agricultural productivity and competitiveness across Europe, to encourage and promote sustainable use of technology in order to meet increasing food demand, various pesticides are used across the European region.However, many of these crop protection products are monitored for threatening human lives.

The European commission has framed various amendments and legislation to achieve the sustainable use of pesticides by reducing the risks and impacts of pesticides use on human health and environment and promoting the use of integrating pest management (IPM) and other non-chemical alternatives to pesticides.

Agricultural biologicals are beneficial as they enhance productivity, fertility, nutrient availability and overall health of the crops. They have two important functions as protection and enhancement. Plant protection comprise of products like bio-pesticides or biocontrol. Enhancement involves plant growth, yield and health from products such as biostimulants, biofertilizers, or biological crop enhancers.

Global agricultural biologicals market is segmented based on types of agricultural biologicals such as biopesticides, plant extract, beneficial insects, biofertilizers and others. Bioherbicide, bio-insecticide, and bio-fungicide are the sub-types of biopesticides. The market is further segmented based on applications such as cereals, oilseeds & pulses, fruits & vegetables, plantations crops, nursery and others.

“Crop Protection: Protecting Plants to Feed the World”

“The European crop protection chemicals market has been estimated at USD 13.1 Billion in 2015 and is projected to reach USD 16.1 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of 4.17% during the forecast period from 2015 to 2020.”

According to Mordor Intelligence’s, the global volume market for pesticides is projected to reach 3.4 million tons by 2020, an increase from 2.3 million tons in 2014, with a CAGR for volume growth being 6.2% between now and 2020. Current global value market for pesticides stands at $54.8 billion  in 2014 and is projected to reach $81.8 billion by 2020.

“Increased production has to be achieved, while using less land and water, maintaining biodiversity and coping with climate change”

CONFERENCE AGENDA*

Global Crop Protection 2017
13– 14 March 2017
Brussels, Belgium

Day 1: March 13, 2017
 
8.30 AM REGISTRATION & COFFEE
9.00 AM CHAIRMAN’S WELCOME REMARKS
9.10 AM
Global Market for Pesticides and Future Outlook

 

The expansion of the global agrochemical and pesticide industry is predicted to reach 8.7% p.a. in the coming years. Between 2007 and 2013 the global agrochemical and pesticide market increased with an average annual growth of 9.8%. 41.5% of the global demand in the world market is accounted by herbicides, plant-growth regulators, and anti-sprouting products. The remaining market share is divided between insecticides, fungicides and disinfectants and other agrochemicals and pesticides contributing 27.1%, 21.5%, 3.4% and 6.5%, respectively. China, France, Germany, India, and the United States represent the largest agrochemical and pesticide market.

  Presenter:
Dr. Bob Fairclough
Team Leader – amis® AgriGlobe®
Kleffmann Group

 

 9.40 AM
Looking into the Future of Biologicals and Global Regulatory Framework

 

  Presenter:
Dr José João Dias Carvalho
Head of Global Business Development- Agro Dossiers
Dr. Knoell Consult GmbH

10.10 AM
Reducing Risk and Harmonizing the Use of Pest Control Products Worldwide

 

  Presenter:
Dr. Imme Gerke
Global Regulatory Strategist
IDRG
11.00 AM Morning Coffee Break & Networking
11.30 AM
Establishing Novel Breeding Methods for Crop Improvement and Development

 

  Presenter:
Jim Dunwell
Professor of Plant Biotechnology
University of Reading, UK


12.00 PM
Improving Food Security and Livelihoods through Reduced Losses to Pests and Invasive Species

 

Tackling Invasive Alien Species is essential to ensure effective control over international spread of diseases. The impact that crop pests have on pre- and post-harvest losses has lead to rise of multiple problems creating a emerging need for more effective systems such as Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Classical Biological Control (CBC), to be put in place to overcome some of the major crop issues.

  Presenter:
Dr. Janny Vos
Strategic Partnerships Director
CABI

 

12.30 PM
Electricity to Treat Weed – Greener and Organic Alternative to Herbicides

 

Electricides systemically kill weeds as the flow of electricity down the stem into the roots kill the growth and control centres found below the surface of the ground, making it ideal for treating invasive species. Using electricity for weed control is organic, environmentally friendly, residue and chemical free. It is also ideal for a wide range of weeds, scenarios and weather conditions.

  Presenter:
Andrew Diprose
Executive Director
Ubiqutek


1.00 PM Networking Lunch
2.00 PM
EU Crop Forecast and Latest Trends in the Crop Production Sector

 

A boost in the population has lead to growth in the production of crops worldwide. Developing regions are adopting numerous measure and trends to meet the future demands for a growing world. As for the EU Crop Production market, it is set for a constant rise in the upcoming years. Latest trends and drivers have shaped the EU crop production sector, leading to the emerging need for advance technology, understanding consumer demand and analyzing adverse effects of PPP on the environment.

  Presenter:
Jens Schaps
Resource Director
DG Trade


2.30 PM
Comprehending the Positive Use of Seed Treatment and Biologicals Development Work for Pest Control

 

With time, techniques of pest control have changed. In today’s era we finally have some creative methods, such as seed treatment and biological development. Seed treatment prevents plant from diseases, storage insects, seed rot, and seedling blights. It also improves germination and controls soil insects. Biological development is more effective than synthetic pesticides for long term, is relatively cheaper than chemical pesticides, and also does not produce any harmful residues.

  Presenter:
Torsten Nilsson
Owner
Nelson Garden AB


3.00 PM
What if Safe is Not Enough? Addressing the Need for a More Sustainable Use of Pesticides

 

Global pesticide use and crop production steadily increase to feed our growing world population. Simultaneously, pesticides contribute to human and environmental health burden. Reliable and easy-to-use screening methods are required and will be presented to identify hot-spots and set starting points for targeted optimization of pesticide design and application practices.

  Presenter:
Peter Fantke
Associate Professor
Technical University of Denmark


3.20 PM Afternoon Coffee Break & Networking
3.40 PM
Apprehending the Growth of Biostimulants and Micronutrients Market

 

Biostimulants and micronutrients continue to gain acceptance globally and make available new solutions which can help growers cultivate healthier crops with reduced basic synthetic inputs. Biostimulants and micronutrients ingredients assist to enhance nutrient uptake and translocation in plants. They also help with the delivery of active ingredients and make the plant more responsive to lower dose applications, ultimately resulting in lesser residue.

  Presenter:
Robert Cannings
Commercial Director
PHC


4.10 PM
Agrochemical Mega Mergers and Emerging Markets

 

 

  Presenter:
Quan Le
Founder
GrowmoreX


4.40 PM
Exploring the Potential of Different Fungi in Fighting Soil Borne and Substrate Related Diseases

 

  Presenter:
Sarah Van Beneden
Product Manager 
Microbials bij Biobest N.V.

 

5.10 PM Q & A
5.00 PM End of Day 1
 
Day 2: March 14, 2017
 
9.00 AM CHAIRMAN’S WELCOME REMARKS
9.10 AM
Latest Agricultural Technologies for Developed and Developing Countries in Order to Enhance their Crop Productivity

 

  Presenter:
Quan Le
Founder
GrowmoreX


9.40 AM
Phytobiomes: Embracing Complexity to Achieve a New Vision for Agriculture

 

  Presenter:
Kellye Eversole
Executive Director
International Phytobiomes Alliance
 & 
President
Eversole Associates

10.10 AM
Advancements in the Agro Sector: Utilizing Cloud-based Applications to Increase Crop Yields and Farmers’ Profitability

 

Cloud-based Applications assists farmers understand the complexity of weather, climate change and pest patterns thus, minimizing the use of chemical fertilizers, fungicides and pesticides. It can help farmers detect, identify and treat their crops earlier, letting them use less chemicals in the field. Cloud-based Applications collects data from a range of open-source locations like geographic information system (GIS) and weather services. On top of that, it adds a layer of data that the participating farmers supply to the system.

  Presenter:
Amir Szuster
VP- Business Development
ScanTask


10.40 AM Morning Coffee Break & Networking
11.00 AM
Probing into the Latest Biotechnological Research and Development Services for Agricultural Applications

 

The indiscriminate use of synthetic pesticides has generated environmental and public health problems. In recent years, the use of these products and the number of active ingredients has been limited by very restrictive legislation in the EU and other countries. Therefore, there is a growing need for alternative control agents, including natural products and biocontrol. In this context the Biopesticides Group-CSIC has screened hundreds of botanical species from the Iberian Peninsula, the Canary Islands, against a broad spectrum of targets including cop pests and diseases, all responsible for significant economic losses in agriculture and cattle production.
Several species of interest have been identified for crop protection and tick control. Standing out above the rest are Artemisia absinthium var. Candial® for fungal, insect and and nematode control and the fungal endophyte strain YCC4 for nematode control. The bioguided chemical study of these species resulted in the chemical isolation and characterization of their active molecules. Furthermore, both extracts have been patented and licensed to SMEs for the development of new crop protection products.
In this presentation we will outline the discovery, development and future perspective of these promising extracts.

  Presenter:
Dr. Azucena Gonzalez
Research Scientist
Institute of Agricultural Sciences, CSIC

 

11.30 AM
Understanding the Application of Biocontrol Techniques in Conventional Agriculture

 

Application of biocontrol techniques for crop protection is amongst one of the most prominent technologies being used for sustainable agriculture. Biocontrol techniques reduce the effect of crop pests, diseases and reliance on harmful synthetic pesticides; minimizing negative impact on the environment. They can be an important component of integrated pest management (IPM) programs, which can assist in combining alternative pest control methods along with monitoring pest population, crop rotation and mechanical pest control.

  Presenter:
Dr Sandro Frati
New Business Development
Bi-Pa

12.00 PM
Agricultural Mapping: Monitoring Soil and Other Key Data Layers in Order to Achieve Crop Superiority

 

Nowadays, remote sensing techniques are widely being used in agricultural practices for knowing the accurate farm condition, in time. Agricultural mapping contributes in analyzing yield determination and soils, crop health and unfavorable growing conditions along with early detection of crop stress during the growing season. Monitoring of crop conditions is essential and assists in implementation of effective management decisions to attain optimum farm production.

 

  Presenter:
Prof. Dr. Clement Atzberger
Full Professor and Head IVFL
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences

 

12.30 PM
The Role of Extension Education in Taking the University to the People

 

Dr. Mohamed will discuss the role of Extension educators in helping producers on 2.2 million farms in the United States produce an abundant, safe, reliable and relatively inexpensive supply of food for its 313 million inhabitants. The session will discuss the role of pesticide registration, safety training, and special exemptions for emergency use in non-routine pest problems, as well as the adoption, use and challenges of using transgenic technology in the USA. Dr. Mohamed will use my expertise in the sugarbeet industry as a case study.

The role of Extension educators is to helping farmers produce an abundant, safe, reliable and relatively inexpensive supply of food. The session will discuss the role of pesticide registration, safety training, and special exemptions for emergency use in non-routine pest problems, as well as the adoption, use and challenges of using transgenic technology in the USA.

 

  Presenter:
Dr. Mohamed Khan
Professor and Extension Sugarbeet Specialist
North Dakota State University & University of Minnesota

 

1.00 PM Q&A
1.30 PM Lunch
2.30 PM End of Conference

*Agenda content and timeline subject to change.

KEEPING UP WITH THE INDUSTRY’S VIEWS

TTTTF, Cocoa Pod Borer, Potato Blight, Banana Fungus, Coffee Leaf Rust

Posted on: 22 February 2017

Existence of TTTTF, a kind of stem rust—named for the characteristic brownish stain it lays down as it destroys wheat leaves and stems—damaged tens of thousands hectares of crops in Sicily. Tests suggests that the pathogen can infect dozens of laboratory-grown strains of wheat, including hardy varieties that are usually highly resistant to crop disease. Wheat rust, a devastating disease known as the “polio of agriculture”, has spread from Africa to South and Central Asia, the Middle East and Europe, with calamitous losses for the world’s second most important grain crop, after rice.

Adding further concern, two new strains of another wheat disease, yellow rust, have been spotted over large areas of Europe for the first time, causing severe wheat damage. Source Greater influx of crop pathogens has influenced breeders, scientists and agrochemical companies in Europe and all across the world to share diagnostic facilities and crucial information about potential outbreaks. Producing resistant varieties, along with study of invasive crop species and early-warning system will provide farmers enough warning to monitor fields and apply fungicides. Timely action is Crucial!

What are the other deadly crop diseases and what are the potential effects? Developing resistant crops is the answer? Halting the crop disease’s spread, CABI’s, Strategic Partnerships Director, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, at Hotel Novotel Brussels Centre Tour Noire, Belgium, will shed light upon the benefits of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Classical Biological Control (CBC), to be put in place to overcome some of the major crop issues facing the world.

To find out more about Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

To reserve your spot  Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Wolbachia: New Means of Controlling Crop-Damaging Pest

Posted on: 16 February 2017

A bacterium common in insects has been discovered in a plant-parasitic roundworm, opening up the possibility of a new, environmentally friendly way of controlling the crop-damaging pest. The worm, Pratylenchus penetrans, is one of the "lesion nematodes" — microscopic animals that deploy their mouths like syringes to extract nutrients from the roots of plants, damaging them in the process. This particular nematode uses more than 150 species as hosts, including mint, raspberry, lily and potato.

The newly discovered bacterium is a strain in the genus Wolbachia, one of the world's most widespread endosymbionts (organisms that live within other organisms), contributing majorly in Nematode biocontrol. Wolbachia is present in roughly 60% of the globe's arthropods, among them insects, spiders and crustaceans, and also lives in nematodes that cause illness in humans.

Adoption of Biocontrol strategy for the effective management of crop pests and diseases has been addressed by many regions. The potential for managing the pest population via biocontrol rather than environment-damaging fumigants, is the need for the hour. In regard to this , the New Unit of BiPA, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will shed light upon the application of biocontrol techniques for crop protection, along with techniques to reduce the effect of crop pests, diseases and reliance on harmful synthetic pesticides; minimizing negative impact on the environment.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

A New Technique is a Whole New Way of Looking at Crop Protection

Posted on: 6 February 2017

Gene-silencing—is a new crop protection technique that acts as a better alternative to chemical products. This technique targets the crops themselves, giving them an added ability to ward off pests and diseases by targeting crop genes, without altering their DNA.

By using a non-toxic, degradable spray based on nanotechnology, gene silencing contributes in tackling the two greatest threats to global food crops—pests and diseases. By combining clay nanoparticles with designer ‘RNAs’ (molecules with essential roles in gene biology), it is possible to silence certain genes within plants. The spray has been shown to give plants virus protection for at least 20 days following a single application. When sprayed, the plant ‘thinks’ it is being attacked by a disease or pest insect and responds by protecting itself.Source 

With the crop industry striving towards achieving global food security, the need for new technologies such as ‘gene silencing’ is a way forward to solve global challenges affecting crop protection. Global Crop Protection 2017, conference scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, aims to disseminate knowledge on numerous approaches that integrates practices for economic control of pests. Addressing the need of integrated pest management for sustainable agriculture, Researcher from Julius Kuehn-Institut will highlight the leading complement and alternatives to synthetic pesticides, along with the best combination of cultural, biological and chemical measures to manage diseases, insects, weeds and other pests; taking into account all relevant control tactics and methods that are locally available, evaluating their potential cost-effectiveness.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Understanding the Phytobiomes for Improved Crop Productivity

Posted on: 30 January 2017

It is a critical time in which new innovative approaches are needed to sustainably increase global crop productivity to meet the demand of an additional 2.4 billion people by 2050. To tackle agricultural complex challenges, a complete analysis of phytobiomes along with complete investigation on endophytic communities could provide critical information to drive agriculture innovations. Addressing the information gaps in bacterial gene expression in soil and possible future research to develop an understanding of core rhizosphere microbiome and how plant roots are influenced by it.

A shift in agricultural production from managing primarily individual components of cropping systems to managing whole systems using comprehensive systems-based knowledge of phytobiomes is the need of the hour. The current technological developments, such as advances in genomic technologies, computational sciences, system-level approaches and precision agriculture – are enabling unprecedented insights for probing the complex interactions within phytobiomes. It is envisioned that growers will have at their disposal crop varieties that better exploit phytobiome components in specific environments for stronger resilience to pests and limited water and nutrients. Translating knowledge of phytobiomes into next generation precision agriculture tools and techniques will empower farmers to produce sufficient crops to meet global demands.Source 

This conference will bring together all ongoing initiatives from diverse scientific disciplines and connecting the dots between fundamental science and application, with an aim to provide growers with practical tools to manage his/her own crop biomes for maximum efficiency, sustainability, and profitability President, Eversole Associates, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will focus on microbiome efforts to design a path forward for a phytobiomes systems approach, shed light upon the patterns for enabling paradigm shift in crop production, prescribe cropping systems, methods, and management practices best suited for a particular farm or field.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Biostimulants and Micronutrients: What the Future Holds ?

Posted on: 24 January 2017

The Biostimulants and Micronutrients market is projected to reach USD 2.91 Billion by 2021, at a CAGR of 10.4% and USD 8.05, at a CAGR of 8.2% Billion by 2021, respectively. The market continues to grow faster than many other areas of the crop protection sector.


The demand for biostimulants and micronutrients is driven by the emerging need for sustainable crop production practices, increasing demand of biofuels, high-quality yield and the growing requirement for food across the world, with China, India, and Japan predicted to be the fastest growing market from the Asia-Pacific region. Nutritive food, need for sustainable crop yields and management of crop production costs are the main factors fueling the market development in this region. Source 1

Row crops, microbials, zinc and cereals segments are the major contributors, assisting in the consistent development of the Biostimulants and Micronutrients sectors. Increasing investment in crop protection industry along with governmental subsidies and awareness programs, are meant to support and create a self-sustaining environment for these segments to flourish. In regard to this, the Commercial Director of PHC, at the conference Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13–14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will discuss upon the emerging worldwide demand for biostimulants and micronutrients and increasing their usage for enhancing crop yields, highlight growth opportunities for major market players, and shed light on the upcoming innovative solutions in this arena, and also give an overview of the current and future market scenario.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

With or Without pesticide? - Europe Crop Protection Chemicals Market – Growth, Trends and Forecasts

Is Europe ready to increase crop production without using pesticides? this can be never possible because overall crop production in Europe depends on pesticides and for decades it is being helping farmers to compete with increasing food demand.  Growth in the demand for the crop protection chemicals is expected to exceed in future as the Europe and other parts of the world continue to use it to safeguard their crop from various insects, diseases and pests.Growing demand for crop protection chemicals is compelling global players to widen their crop protection offerings.

Increasing European population has pushed farmers and crop experts to depend extensively on pesticides to meet ever-increased food demand, New legislation-‘pesticides package’ – recently adopted by the European Parliament creates new constraints on the use of plant protection products and calls for an in-depth reconsideration of crop protection solutions throughout Europe.

In Europe as well as in other parts of the world, pesticide market is driven by the need to increase crop yield and its efficiency. The Europe’s population is growing, but the land is decreasing pushing farmers to increase their yields. New farming practices are adopted by farmers to increase crop yields.

Meanwhile, Bio-pesticides adoption is also occurring all over the Europe, especially in developed and some developing countries. Pesticides help in optimal usage of resources for plant growth and protect the crop from various pathogens.

Pesticides can be broadly classified into four groups depending on their usage. Farmers use herbicides for killing unwanted plants called weeds, insecticides for killing insects, fungicides for treating diseases caused by fungus and other pesticides for treating diseases, which are not caused by fungi or insects. Fungicides accounted for more than 32% of total pesticides sales in 2015.

As per the recent studies,the direct economic impact due to the absence of viable plant protection solutions for crops has been estimated over a billion Euros per year, impacting million of hectares throughout Europe.

The global crop protection product demand is being driven by decreasing arable land, ever-increasing population and the need for higher crop yields. However, the Complicating matters are growing attention and regulation on chemical pesticides, which can be toxic to the environment at large. Crop protection product producers need to tackle this situation and look for more eco-friendly crop protection products. For companies like Eco-Pesticides that are focused on biologic-based pesticides.

Major legislative challenges for the crop protection industry

Before discussing various challenges that European crop protection industry confronts in order to  protect the environment from toxic pesticides and to achieve ever-growing food demand.First, we need to understand the overall dependence of European agriculture on chemicals. According to the reports, the European market for crop protection chemicals, in terms of active ingredient volume was estimated at 639.4 KT in 2011 and is expected to reach 741.9.5KT by 2018. Europe is the second largest market for herbicides.

A new report by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has found that more than 97% of foods contain pesticide residue levels that fall within legal limits.

About 55% of the samples evaluated by EFSA were free of detectable traces of these chemicals.This means nearly half of food products in Europe contain residues of pesticides. Europe’s food supply is among the safest in the world, however, some traces of pesticides exceeding the maximum residue levels (MRLs) were found more often in imported food (5.7%) than in samples originating from the EU and the European Economic Area (1.4%).

Feeding rapidly growing population while relying on ever-scarcer natural resources and protecting the environment. Europe has a responsibility to address that challenge by improving food security and ensuring the contribution of sustainable, productive agriculture to the environment and the economy

Pesticides play a pivotal role in agricultural productivity and competitiveness across Europe, to encourage and promote sustainable use of technology in order to meet increasing food demand, various pesticides are used across the European region.However, many of these crop protection products are monitored for threatening human lives.

The European commission has framed various amendments and legislation to achieve the sustainable use of pesticides by reducing the risks and impacts of pesticides use on human health and environment and promoting the use of integrating pest management (IPM) and other non-chemical alternatives to pesticides.

Agricultural biologicals are beneficial as they enhance productivity, fertility, nutrient availability and overall health of the crops. They have two important functions as protection and enhancement. Plant protection comprise of products like bio-pesticides or biocontrol. Enhancement involves plant growth, yield and health from products such as biostimulants, biofertilizers, or biological crop enhancers.

Global agricultural biologicals market is segmented based on types of agricultural biologicals such as biopesticides, plant extract, beneficial insects, biofertilizers and others. Bioherbicide, bio-insecticide, and bio-fungicide are the sub-types of biopesticides. The market is further segmented based on applications such as cereals, oilseeds & pulses, fruits & vegetables, plantations crops, nursery and others.

Dr. Mohamed Khan
Professor and Extension Sugarbeet Specialist
North Dakota State University & University of Minnesota

Dr. Mohamed Khan is a Professor and Extension Sugarbeet Specialist for North Dakota State University and the University of Minnesota.  He develops, conducts and evaluate educational programs which has significantly improved sugarbeet production in North Dakota and Minnesota.  Dr. Khan research is aimed at improving management of sugarbeet diseases. Dr. Khan is the secretary of the Sugarbeet Research and Education Board of Minnesota and North Dakota which funds research and educational programs in sugarbeet production.  Dr. Khan is also the Chairman of the International Sugarbeet Institute which organizes an annual two day trade show for growers and allied industry personnel who produce 56% of the US sugarbeet. Dr. Khan received his BS from the University of Guyana, MS from the University of Bath, UK, and his Ph.D. from Clemson University.

Dr. Imme Gerke
Global Regulatory Strategist
IDRG

With a Ph.D. in cell biology Dr. Gerke developed biological insecticides in Switzerland, Madagascar, Burkina Faso, the US and Canada. The active ingredients in these products were local strains of baculoviruses and the end-use products were produced and formulated locally.
With this experience Dr. Gerke became the Canadian Minor Use Advisor in 2002 and changed her position in 2004 to become one of the facilitators that the Canadian regulatory body put in place upon her advice. These facilitators brought together growers, processors, traders, scientists, registrants and regulators to cooperate in building a time- and resource-efficient cooperation for the authorization of plant protection products.

In 2012, Dr. Gerke left her government position to be able to create the same kind of cooperative approach that had been built in Canada now among OECD member- and observer-states. She travels the world bringing together growers, registrants and regulators in global cooperation across political borders. The goal of her work is the international harmonization of the use of plant protection products, the disappearance of non-tariff trade-barriers based on the differences in the approval of plant protection products and an end to the destruction of agricultural commodities.

Dr. Bob Fairclough
Team Leader – amis® AgriGlobe®
Kleffmann Group

Following his departure from AMIS Global, Dr. Fairclough has briefly established “Better Market Decisions” as a platform to promote his services to agencies and clients alike. Due to the historic relationship with the Kleffmann Group, he was soon approached to join their International team, where Dr. Fairclough was able to build on his familiarity with Kleffmann market data and develop Kleffmann’s own global agrochemical and seed information products. This capitalized on Dr. Fairclough significant experience in these sectors and enabled him to re-establish the continuity of client contact that he had enjoyed previously.

Dr Janny Vos
Strategic Partnerships Director
CABI

Dr Janny Vos is CABI’s Strategic Partnerships Director with a global responsibility for CABI’s development of strategic projects and partnerships. Dr Vos is a specialist in Integrated Crop Management, using participatory approaches to agricultural extension and research. She has developed training modules for discovery learning about sustainable production of various annual and perennial crops, among which vegetables, cocoa and apple, but has also been involved in supporting and implementing policies on phase-out of methyl bromide. She has been advisor on DFID, SDC, EU, FAO regional and global programmes on Integrated Pest Management (IPM).
Dr Vos has been employed with CABI since 1995, initially in Malaysia, subsequently in UK and currently based in the Netherlands. Prior to 1995, she was employed by the Netherlands government to work in Indonesia as an IPM expert.

Prof. Jim Dunwell
Professor of Plant Biotechnology
University of Reading, UK

Jim Dunwell is Professor of Plant Biotechnology at the University of Reading in the UK. His research interests are in the molecular genetic and epigenetic responses of plants to biotic and abiotic stress. I have a longstanding interest in the development and regulation of biotech products, including GMOs and those produced through new breeding techniques. For the last 12 years, he has been a member of the Defra Advisory Committee for Releases to the Environment, the group that advises the UK government on the field testing and cultivation of GM crops.

Dr. Azucena Gonzalez
Research Scientist
Institute of Agricultural Sciences, CSIC

Dr. Azucena Gonzalez is a Research Scientist at the Institute of Agricultural Sciences, CSIC, and previously was Scientist at the IPNA-CSIC. She received her PhD from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain and worked at the University of California, Los Angeles and Hokkaido Agricultural Experimental Station, Japan, as a Postgraduate Researcher. She leads a research group focused primarily on the research and development of botanical and fungal biopesticides (The Biopesticide group-CSIC).

She has published more than 130 original research articles in the fields of applied phytochemistry. She is also author or co-author of several review articles, book chapters, etc. and has directed seven PhD Thesis.
SE has spent over 25 years working on the optimization and biotechnological production of biopesticides in national and international projects, resulting in numerous scientific publications, dissertations and patents.

Kellye Eversole
Executive Director
International Phytobiomes Alliance
&
President
Eversole Associates

Kellye founded Eversole Associates, a S&T consulting firm, in 1991 following years of professional training in political science and philosophy and working in the US Senate and as head of a Federal study commission. Initial projects focused on agricultural biotechnology for plants and animals. Then, beginning in 1994, she led the highly successful campaign that established the US plant genome program while coordinating activities towards obtaining the reference sequence for the maize genome. She went on to lead the Alliance for Animal Genome Research focused on sequencing the cow, pig, chicken, sheep, dog, and cat genomes and the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium which is delivering this year the first high quality reference sequence of bread wheat. In 2016, the International Alliance for Phytobiomes Research was established to advance a systems-level approach for agricultural production. The phytobiome consists of plants, associated micro-and macro organisms, and their environment (soil, climate …).

Jens Schaps
Director
European Commision 

Jens Schaps has occupied the position of DG Trade’s Resource Director and supervised the Chief economist in DG Trade. In this position he formulated guidelines how to best develop and design the common trade policy which falls under the Community competence. This involved in depth analysis of potential economic trade interest for both bilateral and multilateral trade agreements.

In DG Budget he was responsible as Head of Unit for the expenditure for the Structural and Agricultural Funds and continued in the financial area as Head of Unit in charge of the FEOGA guarantee expenditures paid to Members States through the national paying agencies in DG AGRI.

Dr. José Carvalho
Head of Global Business Development, Agro Dossiers
Dr. Knoell Consult GmbH

Dr. José Joao Carvalho is Head of Global Business Development and Regulatory Policy for Agro dossiers at Dr. Knoell Consult, an independent service provider for Regulatory Affairs and Product Registrations since 20 years. With his regional teams, José is looking after new regulatory policies and guidance development in the different regions, focusing on regulatory frameworks impacting agriculture productivity: plant protection products (chemical and non-chemical solutions), new application technologies, soil-less technologies, soil amendments, genetic varieties, water policy.

Previously he was an European and Global Registration Manager for crop protection and biocide products, coordinating active ingredient and product’s dossiers for approval by national regulatory agencies (market-assess) in different regions, on behalf of several R&D multinational companies.

Sarah Van Beneden
Team Leader R&D
and Product Manager
Microbials
Biobest N.V

As a plant pathologist, Sarah in 2009 obtained the degree of Doctor of Applied Biological Sciences: Agricultural Sciences at Ghent University. The subject of her PhD was ‘Sustainable control of soilborne pathogens in lettuce’. The next three years, she has been working as a Post Doc in at Ghent University, screening biological control agents in several plant-pathogen systems in semi-field and field conditions. In 2012, Sarah joined the Biobest R&D team as a Senior Scientist microbials. Currently, as team leader R&D Microbials and Product Manager Microbials, she is responsible for the selection, development and market penetration of new biopesticide products.

Prof. Dr. Clement Atzberger
Full Professor and Head
IVFL,
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences

Clement is an Earth Observation (EO) expert in the field of crop monitoring with more than 25 years of research and training experience in Africa, Asia and Europe. Since 2010, he is Full Professor and Head of the Institute for Surveying, Remote Sensing and Land Information (IVFL) at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU) in Vienna (≥20 staff).
Besides his academic background in several leading European universities and research institutes (Germany, Netherlands, France and Austria), he has significant working experience in the private EO industry (France) and served several years the European Commission as remote sensing and GIS expert (JRC, Italy).

Clement has a long lasting experience in EO-based crop monitoring and especially for the production of crop maps/acreage information, as well as on crop health status and yield/production forecasts.
Clement is co-founder of Mantle-Labs Ltd. and of Vienna’s Earth Observation Data Center (EODC), the latter being specifically designed for big data analysis in Earth Observation (EO) (e.g. the so-called Copernicus’ Sentinel satellites).

Torsten Nilsson
Owner
Nelson Garden AB

Torsten Nilsson is the majority owner of Nelson Garden Group, the leading seed company for home gardening in Sweden, Norway, Finland and Denmark. For 35 years, he was the managing director of the company.

Currently, Torsten is the managing director of Nelson Seed Development, a company within the group with a unique, patented priming method also suitable for the home garden and organic seed sector.

Peter Fantke
Associate Professor
Technical University of Denmark

Peter Fantke is the Associate professor at Technical University of Denmark. He has over 10 years of research experience – main focus on method and model development for chemical fate, human exposure and human and environmental health effects assessment and chemical substitution, with special focus on pesticides fate, residues, plant uptake, degradation and emission modeling.

Robert Cannings
Commercial Director
PHC

Robert Cannings is the Commercial Director at PHC in charge of the Company’s expansion into new markets and territories in the EMEAA region.  He brings over 25 years of worldwide sales and technical experience across a wide range of conventional and biological products. Previously Robert has worked for Exosect, Bayer, Agraquest, Chemtura, Scotts and Zeneca.

Quan Le
Founder
GrowmoreX

Quan is the founder of growmoreX (www.gmxconsulting.co.uk), agribusiness technology and engineering firm. GrowmoreX brings proven know-hows in a range of tropical crops from Southeast Asia (Vietnam mainly) to advise, develop and operate agriculture and water engineering projects in Africa. The firm has also enabled investors to enter agri inputs sectors (seeds, fertilisers, crop protection) in Africa and Southeast Asia.

Andrew Diprose
Managing Director
Ubiqutek

Andrew is the Managing Director of Ubiqutek. Ubiqutek aims to reduce the use of herbicide by offering a viable alternative that uses electricity to kill weeds. The company has recently launched its first professional hand product for the horticulture and amenity markets and is working with partners to bring the benefits of the technology to agriculture by embodying it within field scale automated weeders.ope.

Amir Szuster
VP- Business Development
ScanTask

Amir Szuster is the VP of Business development in ScanTask. He is in charge of ScanTask’s global expansion and collaborative projects; already working with more than 50 different crops and hundreds of varieties worldwide. Earlier, he also served at ScanTask as the Manager of Projects for Latin America.
Before his employment at ScanTask, he served as the senior analyst and project manager at Zenovar, deeply involved in developing Master Plan for the Agriculture of Suriname.

In Sept 2015, Amir was invited by ABRAPA(Brazilian Association of Cotton Growers) to speak at the Brazilian Cotton Congress. The subject of his presentation there was “Crop Protection, Input savings and decision support tools for Ag-Management for cotton growers”. He was also invited to the “Foro Global Agroalimentario”, the biggest agriculture conference in Mexico, to present the importance of an “Integrated Agronomic Platform for Ag-players”.

Dr. Sandro Frati
New Business Development Unit
BiPA

During his career, Sandro Frati got the chance to study several aspects of biological control. He worked at the University of Torino, Italy, focusing on post-harvest biocontrol in fruit and vegetables. He got afterwards a PhD in entomology from the University of Bologna, Italy, where he worked on Tuta absoluta and on the development of ecofriendly control strategies.

After several years in academia, he joined BiPA in 2013 where he leads the new business development unit. He focuses on scouting and development of new active ingredients of biological origin. As part of his tasks, he gained an extended knowledge of the most relevant crops and farming systems as well as the gaps of solutions in the market in terms of pest control.

He is also directly involved in the development of organic and integrated control strategies and in the valorization of the novel biocontrol products. His overall experience makes him able to understand the needs of the market and the best positioning for the new actives that enter in the pipeline of BiPA.

KEEPING UP WITH THE INDUSTRY’S VIEWS

TTTTF, Cocoa Pod Borer, Potato Blight, Banana Fungus, Coffee Leaf Rust

Posted on: 22 February 2017

Existence of TTTTF, a kind of stem rust—named for the characteristic brownish stain it lays down as it destroys wheat leaves and stems—damaged tens of thousands hectares of crops in Sicily. Tests suggests that the pathogen can infect dozens of laboratory-grown strains of wheat, including hardy varieties that are usually highly resistant to crop disease. Wheat rust, a devastating disease known as the “polio of agriculture”, has spread from Africa to South and Central Asia, the Middle East and Europe, with calamitous losses for the world’s second most important grain crop, after rice.

Adding further concern, two new strains of another wheat disease, yellow rust, have been spotted over large areas of Europe for the first time, causing severe wheat damage. Source Greater influx of crop pathogens has influenced breeders, scientists and agrochemical companies in Europe and all across the world to share diagnostic facilities and crucial information about potential outbreaks. Producing resistant varieties, along with study of invasive crop species and early-warning system will provide farmers enough warning to monitor fields and apply fungicides. Timely action is Crucial!

What are the other deadly crop diseases and what are the potential effects? Developing resistant crops is the answer? Halting the crop disease’s spread, CABI’s, Strategic Partnerships Director, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, at Hotel Novotel Brussels Centre Tour Noire, Belgium, will shed light upon the benefits of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Classical Biological Control (CBC), to be put in place to overcome some of the major crop issues facing the world.

To find out more about Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

To reserve your spot  Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Wolbachia: New Means of Controlling Crop-Damaging Pest

Posted on: 16 February 2017

A bacterium common in insects has been discovered in a plant-parasitic roundworm, opening up the possibility of a new, environmentally friendly way of controlling the crop-damaging pest. The worm, Pratylenchus penetrans, is one of the "lesion nematodes" — microscopic animals that deploy their mouths like syringes to extract nutrients from the roots of plants, damaging them in the process. This particular nematode uses more than 150 species as hosts, including mint, raspberry, lily and potato.

The newly discovered bacterium is a strain in the genus Wolbachia, one of the world's most widespread endosymbionts (organisms that live within other organisms), contributing majorly in Nematode biocontrol. Wolbachia is present in roughly 60% of the globe's arthropods, among them insects, spiders and crustaceans, and also lives in nematodes that cause illness in humans.

Adoption of Biocontrol strategy for the effective management of crop pests and diseases has been addressed by many regions. The potential for managing the pest population via biocontrol rather than environment-damaging fumigants, is the need for the hour. In regard to this , the New Unit of BiPA, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will shed light upon the application of biocontrol techniques for crop protection, along with techniques to reduce the effect of crop pests, diseases and reliance on harmful synthetic pesticides; minimizing negative impact on the environment.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

A New Technique is a Whole New Way of Looking at Crop Protection

Posted on: 6 February 2017

Gene-silencing—is a new crop protection technique that acts as a better alternative to chemical products. This technique targets the crops themselves, giving them an added ability to ward off pests and diseases by targeting crop genes, without altering their DNA.

By using a non-toxic, degradable spray based on nanotechnology, gene silencing contributes in tackling the two greatest threats to global food crops—pests and diseases. By combining clay nanoparticles with designer ‘RNAs’ (molecules with essential roles in gene biology), it is possible to silence certain genes within plants. The spray has been shown to give plants virus protection for at least 20 days following a single application. When sprayed, the plant ‘thinks’ it is being attacked by a disease or pest insect and responds by protecting itself.Source 

With the crop industry striving towards achieving global food security, the need for new technologies such as ‘gene silencing’ is a way forward to solve global challenges affecting crop protection. Global Crop Protection 2017, conference scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, aims to disseminate knowledge on numerous approaches that integrates practices for economic control of pests. Addressing the need of integrated pest management for sustainable agriculture, Researcher from Julius Kuehn-Institut will highlight the leading complement and alternatives to synthetic pesticides, along with the best combination of cultural, biological and chemical measures to manage diseases, insects, weeds and other pests; taking into account all relevant control tactics and methods that are locally available, evaluating their potential cost-effectiveness.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Understanding the Phytobiomes for Improved Crop Productivity

Posted on: 30 January 2017

It is a critical time in which new innovative approaches are needed to sustainably increase global crop productivity to meet the demand of an additional 2.4 billion people by 2050. To tackle agricultural complex challenges, a complete analysis of phytobiomes along with complete investigation on endophytic communities could provide critical information to drive agriculture innovations. Addressing the information gaps in bacterial gene expression in soil and possible future research to develop an understanding of core rhizosphere microbiome and how plant roots are influenced by it.

A shift in agricultural production from managing primarily individual components of cropping systems to managing whole systems using comprehensive systems-based knowledge of phytobiomes is the need of the hour. The current technological developments, such as advances in genomic technologies, computational sciences, system-level approaches and precision agriculture – are enabling unprecedented insights for probing the complex interactions within phytobiomes. It is envisioned that growers will have at their disposal crop varieties that better exploit phytobiome components in specific environments for stronger resilience to pests and limited water and nutrients. Translating knowledge of phytobiomes into next generation precision agriculture tools and techniques will empower farmers to produce sufficient crops to meet global demands.Source 

This conference will bring together all ongoing initiatives from diverse scientific disciplines and connecting the dots between fundamental science and application, with an aim to provide growers with practical tools to manage his/her own crop biomes for maximum efficiency, sustainability, and profitability President, Eversole Associates, at Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13-14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will focus on microbiome efforts to design a path forward for a phytobiomes systems approach, shed light upon the patterns for enabling paradigm shift in crop production, prescribe cropping systems, methods, and management practices best suited for a particular farm or field.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

Biostimulants and Micronutrients: What the Future Holds ?

Posted on: 24 January 2017

The Biostimulants and Micronutrients market is projected to reach USD 2.91 Billion by 2021, at a CAGR of 10.4% and USD 8.05, at a CAGR of 8.2% Billion by 2021, respectively. The market continues to grow faster than many other areas of the crop protection sector.


The demand for biostimulants and micronutrients is driven by the emerging need for sustainable crop production practices, increasing demand of biofuels, high-quality yield and the growing requirement for food across the world, with China, India, and Japan predicted to be the fastest growing market from the Asia-Pacific region. Nutritive food, need for sustainable crop yields and management of crop production costs are the main factors fueling the market development in this region. Source 1

Row crops, microbials, zinc and cereals segments are the major contributors, assisting in the consistent development of the Biostimulants and Micronutrients sectors. Increasing investment in crop protection industry along with governmental subsidies and awareness programs, are meant to support and create a self-sustaining environment for these segments to flourish. In regard to this, the Commercial Director of PHC, at the conference Global Crop Protection 2017, scheduled 13–14 March 2017, in Brussels, Belgium, will discuss upon the emerging worldwide demand for biostimulants and micronutrients and increasing their usage for enhancing crop yields, highlight growth opportunities for major market players, and shed light on the upcoming innovative solutions in this arena, and also give an overview of the current and future market scenario.

To reserve your spot for Global Crop Protection 2017: Click here

With or Without pesticide? - Europe Crop Protection Chemicals Market – Growth, Trends and Forecasts

Is Europe ready to increase crop production without using pesticides? this can be never possible because overall crop production in Europe depends on pesticides and for decades it is being helping farmers to compete with increasing food demand.  Growth in the demand for the crop protection chemicals is expected to exceed in future as the Europe and other parts of the world continue to use it to safeguard their crop from various insects, diseases and pests.Growing demand for crop protection chemicals is compelling global players to widen their crop protection offerings.

Increasing European population has pushed farmers and crop experts to depend extensively on pesticides to meet ever-increased food demand, New legislation-‘pesticides package’ – recently adopted by the European Parliament creates new constraints on the use of plant protection products and calls for an in-depth reconsideration of crop protection solutions throughout Europe.

In Europe as well as in other parts of the world, pesticide market is driven by the need to increase crop yield and its efficiency. The Europe’s population is growing, but the land is decreasing pushing farmers to increase their yields. New farming practices are adopted by farmers to increase crop yields.

Meanwhile, Bio-pesticides adoption is also occurring all over the Europe, especially in developed and some developing countries. Pesticides help in optimal usage of resources for plant growth and protect the crop from various pathogens.

Pesticides can be broadly classified into four groups depending on their usage. Farmers use herbicides for killing unwanted plants called weeds, insecticides for killing insects, fungicides for treating diseases caused by fungus and other pesticides for treating diseases, which are not caused by fungi or insects. Fungicides accounted for more than 32% of total pesticides sales in 2015.

As per the recent studies,the direct economic impact due to the absence of viable plant protection solutions for crops has been estimated over a billion Euros per year, impacting million of hectares throughout Europe.

The global crop protection product demand is being driven by decreasing arable land, ever-increasing population and the need for higher crop yields. However, the Complicating matters are growing attention and regulation on chemical pesticides, which can be toxic to the environment at large. Crop protection product producers need to tackle this situation and look for more eco-friendly crop protection products. For companies like Eco-Pesticides that are focused on biologic-based pesticides.

Major legislative challenges for the crop protection industry

Before discussing various challenges that European crop protection industry confronts in order to  protect the environment from toxic pesticides and to achieve ever-growing food demand.First, we need to understand the overall dependence of European agriculture on chemicals. According to the reports, the European market for crop protection chemicals, in terms of active ingredient volume was estimated at 639.4 KT in 2011 and is expected to reach 741.9.5KT by 2018. Europe is the second largest market for herbicides.

A new report by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has found that more than 97% of foods contain pesticide residue levels that fall within legal limits.

About 55% of the samples evaluated by EFSA were free of detectable traces of these chemicals.This means nearly half of food products in Europe contain residues of pesticides. Europe’s food supply is among the safest in the world, however, some traces of pesticides exceeding the maximum residue levels (MRLs) were found more often in imported food (5.7%) than in samples originating from the EU and the European Economic Area (1.4%).

Feeding rapidly growing population while relying on ever-scarcer natural resources and protecting the environment. Europe has a responsibility to address that challenge by improving food security and ensuring the contribution of sustainable, productive agriculture to the environment and the economy

Pesticides play a pivotal role in agricultural productivity and competitiveness across Europe, to encourage and promote sustainable use of technology in order to meet increasing food demand, various pesticides are used across the European region.However, many of these crop protection products are monitored for threatening human lives.

The European commission has framed various amendments and legislation to achieve the sustainable use of pesticides by reducing the risks and impacts of pesticides use on human health and environment and promoting the use of integrating pest management (IPM) and other non-chemical alternatives to pesticides.

Agricultural biologicals are beneficial as they enhance productivity, fertility, nutrient availability and overall health of the crops. They have two important functions as protection and enhancement. Plant protection comprise of products like bio-pesticides or biocontrol. Enhancement involves plant growth, yield and health from products such as biostimulants, biofertilizers, or biological crop enhancers.

Global agricultural biologicals market is segmented based on types of agricultural biologicals such as biopesticides, plant extract, beneficial insects, biofertilizers and others. Bioherbicide, bio-insecticide, and bio-fungicide are the sub-types of biopesticides. The market is further segmented based on applications such as cereals, oilseeds & pulses, fruits & vegetables, plantations crops, nursery and others.

 
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Venue

Hotel Novotel Brussels Centre Tour Noire
Address: Rue de la Vierge Noire 32, 1000 Bruxelles, Belgium
Phone: +32 2 620 04 28
Website: Hotel BRUSSELS – Novotel Brussels Centre Tour Noire


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