Railway Safety Management

 
2nd-3rd December 2021 Europe

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ABOUT THE COURSE

COURSE OUTLINE

Railway Safety Management


2nd-3rd December 2021 Europe

DAY 1
 
 
Session: Background to railway safety

 

  • Society and Safety – a perspective
    • Railways serving society
    • Safety and risk of harm
    • Societal risk
  • History of improvements in railway safety
  • Pitfalls and bear traps
  • Examples from other industries and from the challenges of automation
 
Session: Failure Statistics, Railway Risks and Consequences

 

  • Examples of current thinking
  • What has been done and is being done (e.g., collection of statistics)
  • What is available
  • Examples of the use of data
Break
 
 
Session: Developing A Safety Management System and Railway Safety Strategies

 

  • An international perspective
  • The basis for current thinking on safety strategies and management
  • Examples of strategies
  • Examples of management systems
  • Common noteworthy elements
    • Taking of responsibility
    • Being curious
    • Exercising judgement
 
Session: Methods for Safety Monitoring and Safety Supervision – Common Safety Methods in European Member States

 

  • A walk with current thinking
    • Monitoring
    • Supervision
  • EU member states – sharing of methods and the benefits being targeted
    • Methods
    • Benefits
    • Challenges – e.g., Cyber Security and Automation
 
Session: Risk Tolerability, Risk Analysis and Trends

 

  • Methods for visualizing and interpreting tolerability
  • Common risk assessment and analysis methods
    • Some thoughts on routines and pitfalls
  • Trends intolerability
  • Trends in safety performance
    • Some comparisons with other transport industries
  • Some wider comparisons – taking us back to the concept of societal risk
 
Session: recap and summary

 

  • Railway safety and society – keeping things running while learning all the time
END OF DAY 1
 
DAY 2
 
 
Session: Principles and Basic Elements of Accident Investigation – Regulatory Requirements

 

  • Typical organizations and their features
    • Independence from the railway industry and government
    • “No-blame” investigations
    • Making recommendations
  • Follow-up of recommendations done by national safety authorities
  • Typical regulations
    • Duty to report
    • Duty to investigate
    • Access to property and witnesses
    • Witness confidentiality
    • Protection from use of accident investigation findings in prosecutions
 
Session: Railway Accidents – Finding & Understanding Causes

 

  • Establishing and investigating – including setting the remit
  • Striking a balance – duration, disruption, and learning benefit: the half-life conundrum
  • Industry-wide collaboration
  • Working with the bereaved
  • Reaching conclusions
  • Drafting recommendations
Break
 
 
Session: Consultation and Communications planning – Communicating in the event of an abnormal event or emergency

 

  • Keeping the public informed
  • The bereaved as a category warranting special care
  • Consultation – on draft recommendations and the draft written report
  • Publication and presentation
  • Follow-up in industry
  • Lessons learned and process improvements
 
Session: Some examples from investigations and benefits they bring

 

  • Example 1
  • Example 2
  • Example 3
  • Common themes and things to bear in mind 
    • Human factors
    • Challenges as we automate transportation more and more
    • Cyber Security
 
Session: recap and summary

 

  • Railway safety and society – getting things running with improvements after a mishap
 

COURSE OUTLINE

Railway Safety Management


2nd-3rd December 2021 Europe

DAY 1
 
 
Session: Background to railway safety

 

  • Society and Safety – a perspective
    • Railways serving society
    • Safety and risk of harm
    • Societal risk
  • History of improvements in railway safety
  • Pitfalls and bear traps
  • Examples from other industries and from the challenges of automation
 
Session: Failure Statistics, Railway Risks and Consequences

 

  • Examples of current thinking
  • What has been done and is being done (e.g., collection of statistics)
  • What is available
  • Examples of the use of data
Break
 
 
Session: Developing A Safety Management System and Railway Safety Strategies

 

  • An international perspective
  • The basis for current thinking on safety strategies and management
  • Examples of strategies
  • Examples of management systems
  • Common noteworthy elements
    • Taking of responsibility
    • Being curious
    • Exercising judgement
 
Session: Methods for Safety Monitoring and Safety Supervision – Common Safety Methods in European Member States

 

  • A walk with current thinking
    • Monitoring
    • Supervision
  • EU member states – sharing of methods and the benefits being targeted
    • Methods
    • Benefits
    • Challenges – e.g., Cyber Security and Automation
 
Session: Risk Tolerability, Risk Analysis and Trends

 

  • Methods for visualizing and interpreting tolerability
  • Common risk assessment and analysis methods
    • Some thoughts on routines and pitfalls
  • Trends intolerability
  • Trends in safety performance
    • Some comparisons with other transport industries
  • Some wider comparisons – taking us back to the concept of societal risk
 
Session: recap and summary

 

  • Railway safety and society – keeping things running while learning all the time
END OF DAY 1
 
DAY 2
 
 
Session: Principles and Basic Elements of Accident Investigation – Regulatory Requirements

 

  • Typical organizations and their features
    • Independence from the railway industry and government
    • “No-blame” investigations
    • Making recommendations
  • Follow-up of recommendations done by national safety authorities
  • Typical regulations
    • Duty to report
    • Duty to investigate
    • Access to property and witnesses
    • Witness confidentiality
    • Protection from use of accident investigation findings in prosecutions
 
Session: Railway Accidents – Finding & Understanding Causes

 

  • Establishing and investigating – including setting the remit
  • Striking a balance – duration, disruption, and learning benefit: the half-life conundrum
  • Industry-wide collaboration
  • Working with the bereaved
  • Reaching conclusions
  • Drafting recommendations
Break
 
 
Session: Consultation and Communications planning – Communicating in the event of an abnormal event or emergency

 

  • Keeping the public informed
  • The bereaved as a category warranting special care
  • Consultation – on draft recommendations and the draft written report
  • Publication and presentation
  • Follow-up in industry
  • Lessons learned and process improvements
 
Session: Some examples from investigations and benefits they bring

 

  • Example 1
  • Example 2
  • Example 3
  • Common themes and things to bear in mind 
    • Human factors
    • Challenges as we automate transportation more and more
    • Cyber Security
 
Session: recap and summary

 

  • Railway safety and society – getting things running with improvements after a mishap
 

   

 

Our Trainer has been a design team leader, project engineer, corporate R&D manager, international accident investigator, national regulator, railway safety specialist and board advisor for 36 years. He has worked extensively with railways across four continents and has a deep understanding of railway best-practice in regulation, management, operations, safety, and engineering from around the world. He obtained his engineering degree while training as an officer in the Royal Navy. In 2004 He joined the Rail Accident Investigation Branch in the UK as one of its four Principal Inspectors, qualifying and managing a team of five accident investigators setting up the then new organisation. He was the lead investigator for the fatal Virgin Trains derailment on Network Rail points at Grayrigg in the UK in 2007. In 2014 He worked for Qatar Rail consulting on the setting up of the national railway regulator for Qatar. From Sep 2014 to March 2017 He worked full-time as an advisor to the programme manager for the Red Line Upgrade programme (RLU) at Trafikförvaltningen. In 2018 He researched and provided an expert opinion to Helsinki City Traffic (HKL), the operator of the Helsinki Metro, in support of their court case against Siemens in relation to HKL’s termination of the contracts with Siemens for automation of the Helsinki Metro in 2015. From July 2020 to Feb 2021 He has reviewed and provided advice to Hiatchi Rail STS on the RAMS part of its bid for the resignalling of the entire Oslo Metro in Norway with CBTC technology. The bid was successfully delivered to Hitachi’s customer on 8 Feb 2021.

 

 

*Early Bird ends on 12th October

 

 

 

Delegate
 
 £699 (Early Bird Price)
 £799 (Usual Price)
 

   

 

Registration fee only covers cost of all sessions & presentations. Fee is not inclusive of 7% Admin/Bank Charges.

 

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